Analena Bruce

Post-Doctoral Fellow
Recreation, Park, and Tourism Studies

anabruce@indiana.edu
(812 ) 856-0166
PH 133

Education
  • Rutgers University, Ph.D., 2016
  • Rutgers University, M.A., 2013
  • University of Pittsburgh, B.A., 2007
Courses
  • Contemporary Social Theory
  • Introduction to Sociology
  • Inequality and Stratification
Background
  • Doctoral Dissertation Award, Rural Sociological Society: Entry and Persistence in Alternative Agriculture: An American Case Study, 2015
  • Agriculture, Food and Human Values Graduate Student Paper Award: Labor of Love: Livelihood Strategies in Sustainable Farming, 2013
  • Matilda White Riley Award for Best Qualifying Paper, Rutgers Sociology: Labor of Love: Livelihood Strategies in Sustainable Farming, 2013
  • Project Leader, Groundswell Education Program, Stinner Summit Grant, Ohio State University Agroecosystems Management Program, 2014-2015, 2015-2016
  • Policy Program Intern, Ohio Ecological Food & Farm Association, 2014-2015
  • Research Assistant, Department of Human Ecology, PI-Rachael Shwom, 2009-2011
  • Pre-dissertation Research Grant, Department of Human Ecology, Rutgers University: The Troubled Legacy of Agrarian Reform: Small Farmers and Foundations of the Fair Trade Cooperative System, 2009
Research Interests

Agriculture and Food Systems, Environment and Society, Science and Technology, Social Movements

Selected Publications

Bruce, Analena B. and Rebecca L. Som Castellano. 2016. Labor and alternative food networks: challenges for farmers and consumers. Renewable Agriculture and Food Systems 1–14. DOI: 10.1017/S174217051600034X

Bruce, Analena B. 2016. Frankenfish or Fish to Feed the World? Scientism and Biotechnology Regulatory Policy. Rural Sociology DOI:10.1111/ruso.12146

Bruce, Analena B. 2016. The Troubled Legacy of Agrarian Reform: Small Farmers and Foundations of the Fair Trade Cooperative System. Geography Compass 10/12: 485–498. DOI: 10.1111/gec3.12298

Bruce, Analena B. and Rachael L. Shwom. 2015. Friend or Foe? Why US Energy Efficiency Nonprofits Collaborate with Business and Government. Environmental Sociology 1 (1): 48-58. DOI: 10.1080/23251042.2014.993796